Spirits Craft
nevver:

Klimt

jinxdragonfly:

So how I cleanse my house of bad vibes is that I take a hot coal which if you smoke hookah you will have the small ones in the house. And I mix my own dry sage, red rose petals and dry mint. I put it in a glass like a wine glass with foil in it. Place half the mixture in the glass and then coal…

irelandseyeonmyth:

'The Cailleachs House' rises out of the bog that blankets Sleibh Gullion mountain.

Its the highest passage tomb in Ireland, its 5000 years old and its aligned to the setting sun at the winter solstice. The light from the setting sun travels up the passage and lights up the inner chamber.


The Chamber was originally dark for the rest of the year but the corbelled roof has collapsed. The others have lasted 5000 years so maybe its the building materials available in the environment. The moutain itself is an extinct volcano and its exposed to the elements at 573 meters above sea level.

The passage tomb has a strong role in folk culture as the home of the Cultic Cailleach and the local geography all has her name on it. A nearby lake is hers and theres a hill called the Cailleachs chair. In Myth its the house of the blacksmith Culainn where Cu Chulainn gets his name by killing the smiths dog and taking its role as protector of the land.

http://aclockworkireland.blogspot.ie/

beyonce-huxtable:

sylvysparrow:

this is important always

Dis why I love ha

Standing on the stile she pointed her finger at Madam Noy and made the lady ‘shake in her shoes;’ whilst she nodded her head, waved her out-stretched hand, and ill-wished her by saying,—

"Mary Noy, thou ugly, old, and spiteful plague,
I give thee the collick, the palsy, and ague.
All the eggs thy fowls lay, from this shall be addle,
All thy hens have the pip and die with the straddle.
And before nine moons have come and gone,
Of all thy coppies there shan’t live one:
Thy arm and thy hand, that cast the stone,
Shall wither and waste to skin and bone,”
Madam Noy was never well from that day, her fowls’ eggs were always bad, and all Betty’s spells took effect. Before six months were past she lost her coppies every one; for, in place of gay tufts of feathers, the chickens’ brains came out on all those hatched from her coppies’ eggs.

The Story of Madam Noy (via gardenofthequeen)

Charm for a scald, wild-fire, burn, or any other inflammatory disease.

The person to be charmed gathers nine bramble leaves, which are put into a vessel of spring water; then each leaf is passed


over and from the diseased part, whilst repeating three times to each leaf as follows:—

"Three ladies come from the east,
One with fire and two with frost;
Out with thee fire, and in with thee frost,
In the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost.”
A stick of fire is then taken from the hearth -and passed over and around the diseased part whilst the above is repeated nine times.

Charm for a scald, wild-fire, burn, or any other inflammatory disease: Traditions and Hearthside Stories of West Cornwall, Vol. 2 (via gardenofthequeen)
The Cornish drolls are dead, each one;
The fairies from their haunts have gone:
There’s scarce a witch in all the land,
The world has grown so learn’d and grand.
 Henry Quick, of Zennor (via gardenofthequeen)

Standing on the stile she pointed her finger at Madam Noy and made the lady ‘shake in her shoes;’ whilst she nodded her head, waved her out-stretched hand, and ill-wished her by saying,—

"Mary Noy, thou ugly, old, and spiteful plague,
I give thee the collick, the palsy, and ague.
All the eggs thy fowls lay, from this shall be addle,
All thy hens have the pip and die with the straddle.
And before nine moons have come and gone,
Of all thy coppies there shan’t live one:
Thy arm and thy hand, that cast the stone,
Shall wither and waste to skin and bone,”
Madam Noy was never well from that day, her fowls’ eggs were always bad, and all Betty’s spells took effect. Before six months were past she lost her coppies every one; for, in place of gay tufts of feathers, the chickens’ brains came out on all those hatched from her coppies’ eggs.

The Story of Madam Noy (via gardenofthequeen)
In the classical world, the moon-goddess most associated with magic was Hecate. A lunar deity often placed in a sort of triumvirate with Diana and the goddess Selene, Hecate was also closely associated with the underworld as was very much a figure of malevolence and terror. She was imagined as a three-face spirit who roamed the night and haunted crossroads, visible only to dogs. The howl of dogs at night was believed to be a sign that Hecate was approaching. She was a patron of magic and magicians. The Greek power Theocritus (cs. 320-250 BCE) composed a poem appropriately entitles the sorceresses (Pharamakeutriai) in which a young woman named simatha attempted to rekindle the passion of her lover by magical means. She gathered various ingredients and implements and performed a ritual on a moonlit night that summoned Hecate. She then used the goddess’s power in a binding spell of some sort.
Magic and Superstition in Europe, a concise history from antiquity to the present, by Michael D Bailey, assistant professor of history at Iowa State university. 2007. (via charlottesarahscrivener)

charlottesarahscrivener:

The category of magic is often quite vague and its boundaries can be quite fluid. Seemingly clean enough in a very general sense – everyone know more or less what is meant by “magic” or “magical” after all – the term proves terrible difficult to define coherently and…