Spirits Craft
Why are toads so often used in instances of manipulation and coercion? What stories contribute this virtue to this warty amphibian?
Anonymous

rootandrock:

pvwitch:

spiritscraft:

norvicensiandoran:

rootandrock:

In short, because people very much like to drop a nuke on something when a firecracker would do the job.

The tools and amulets most associated with what we would consider “not the nicest sort of magic” to downright “roofie spells” are often obtained via the torture and slow death of an animal. That’s no coincidence. Toads are powerful creatures and the unscrupulous will manipulate, twist, and torture that power to their own ends.

Toads are born in and breathe water, then shape-shift and learn to walk on land and breathe air.  They traverse the under and overworlds with ease. They are wild, warty, and yet can be hand-tamed even in their wild state. Full wild toads will take crickets from your fingertips if you’re careful and quiet. They sing and “speak”, and can even answer the occasional question (if you’re willing to accept peeps and croaks as an answer).

So, I do not think the toad specifically embodies the power to manipulate. I think it has power, and people use it for that end.

Toads are historically associated with rewarding kind people with the secrets of immortality and the like. I shudder to think of what they do to people who crucify them on anthills.

Perfect response to things I’ve seen going around in the past is perfect.

Yes this.

We had/have a toad living under the porch. I had to relocate him when the dog found his hiding place. I’ve been curious about toad lore that didn’t involve hurting the cute little bugger.

I mean, you have the “Frog Prince” type stories which are well and good. I believe the stories I remember about kind treatment, wortcunning, and immortality was from Japan.

My personal experience has been that the kinder you are to a frog, toad, or aligned spirit the kinder they will be toward you. I also tend to notice their numbers swelling locally after intensive work with the “great toad”.

However? Just being kind to animals in general is always an excellent thing.  I don’t even know if it is specific, but… shit tends to go better in my life when I take the time to be kind and helpful to critters.

In Cornish Pellar craft as Gemma Gary describes it you utilize found dried or dead toads rather than torturing them to death. I have such a little guy—he probably just died a natural death on the road. I think generally its a better way to go, most folks have never killed a vertibrate in their life and there is no reason to start with a toad. (If you want to take up animal slaughter why not start with a food animal like chicken? and learn to do it with a minimal of pain—quick and merciful as is honorable to the animal as a food source).

rootandrock:

Though it’s often said that dead wood is devoid of the spirit of the plant, I don’t always think this is true. Secondary to this one can conjure the spirit back into it, and render the point mostly-sorta-moot anyway (also true for wood which was cut-live, but improperly and arrives to you “dead”).

dennys:

it-happens01:

Red white and blue pancakes at #dennys for #laborday #yum #breakfast with @coolstorysooz

Celebrating Labor Day right!!

I may have to go to Denny’s for dinner tonight. Or breakfast tonight, if you catch my meaning.

dennys:

it-happens01:

Red white and blue pancakes at #dennys for #laborday #yum #breakfast with @coolstorysooz

Celebrating Labor Day right!!

I may have to go to Denny’s for dinner tonight. Or breakfast tonight, if you catch my meaning.

graveyarddirt:

Aug 13th, 2012: A Morning’s Work, by Ms. Graveyard Dirt
Last week’s foraging work was wiped out by a plague; Italics’s mother dragged something into the house, and it wasn’t long before he, she and his father were congested, coughing and achy. I miraculously staved off catching summer death thanks to Italics obsessively disinfecting communal surfaces - remote controls, fridge handles, etc. - as I sucked on raw garlic clove after raw garlic clove until portions of my mouth began to peel (my skin’s ridiculously sensitive).
By the time he recovered enough to hit some local hedges’n’forests over a week had past since our last outing. As if we didn’t already feel the burn of lost time, this area was scheduled for a week of fucking rain which meant we had no choice but to hit as many locations as possible before the weather turned.
Under fast-rollin’, low-ridin’ clouds we wove our way through familiar beeches, birches and pines, our bowed heads occasionally anointed by errant drops of rain as we searched for the yellow-orange-gold of chanterelles (Cantharellus cibarius) and the white-speckled tops of the Christmas-coloured fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) while picking up scattered remains of the Lost, Then Found.
See also: A Morning’s Work, Basket of Chanterelles, Christmas-Coloured Entheogens, Corvid Feathers, Deer Remains, Lost, Then Found and Skulls & Bones
DISCLAIMER: If you decide to reblog any of my roadkill pictures please keep all of the relevant information (i.e., name, title and Flickr link) with the image. (Why?)

graveyarddirt:

Aug 13th, 2012: A Morning’s Work, by Ms. Graveyard Dirt

Last week’s foraging work was wiped out by a plague; Italics’s mother dragged something into the house, and it wasn’t long before he, she and his father were congested, coughing and achy. I miraculously staved off catching summer death thanks to Italics obsessively disinfecting communal surfaces - remote controls, fridge handles, etc. - as I sucked on raw garlic clove after raw garlic clove until portions of my mouth began to peel (my skin’s ridiculously sensitive).

By the time he recovered enough to hit some local hedges’n’forests over a week had past since our last outing. As if we didn’t already feel the burn of lost time, this area was scheduled for a week of fucking rain which meant we had no choice but to hit as many locations as possible before the weather turned.

Under fast-rollin’, low-ridin’ clouds we wove our way through familiar beeches, birches and pines, our bowed heads occasionally anointed by errant drops of rain as we searched for the yellow-orange-gold of chanterelles (Cantharellus cibarius) and the white-speckled tops of the Christmas-coloured fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) while picking up scattered remains of the Lost, Then Found.

See also: A Morning’s Work, Basket of Chanterelles, Christmas-Coloured Entheogens, Corvid Feathers, Deer Remains, Lost, Then Found and Skulls & Bones

DISCLAIMER: If you decide to reblog any of my roadkill pictures please keep all of the relevant information (i.e., name, title and Flickr link) with the image. (Why?)

charlottesarahscrivener:

Excerpt from: “Burchard’s strigae, the Witches’ Sabbath, and Shamanistic Cannibalism in Early Modern Europe”
by EMMA WILBY
University of Exeter
2013

charlottesarahscrivener:

Excerpt from: “Burchard’s strigae, the Witches’ Sabbath, and Shamanistic Cannibalism in Early Modern Europe” by EMMA WILBY University of Exeter
2013

Free Today on Kindle: Primer on Satanism and the Occult.

coyoteandcranberry:

Hey, I’m looking for lgbt+ or lgbt+ friendly witches and/or pagans C:

Like or reblog if you fit under this description !

My dash is so boring, I need more blogs to follow!

aspirinplease:

I’m interested in all kinds of topics and want to research them so you can reblog/like if you post:

-Pagan stuff

-Herbology

-Otherkin stuff

nightofpan:

Circle of evocation - From An Introduction to the Book of Magic, with Instructions for Invoking Spirits, etc., ca. 1577-1583,  Folger Shakespeare Library MS. V.b.26

nightofpan:

Circle of evocation - From An Introduction to the Book of Magic, with Instructions for Invoking Spirits, etc., ca. 1577-1583,  Folger Shakespeare Library MS. V.b.26

archaeologicalnews:

image

It is a mystery which has intrigued archaeologists for centuries: did the huge Neolithic stones which make up Stonehenge form a complete circle?

Now the puzzle has been answered after the dry summer revealed the faint outline of the missing megaliths.

Usually the ground is watered by…